« Tolerating religious intolerance » by Meera Srinivasan (The Hindu)

Developments unfolding in Sri Lanka over the last few weeks look ominously similar to those in 2013-14, when a surge in targeted attacks against minority Muslims and Christians went unchecked by the Rajapaksa administration. The Muslim Council of Sri Lanka, an umbrella organisation for civil society groups, has recorded 25 attacks on mosques and Muslim-owned establishments since April, and the National Christian Evangelical Alliance of Sri Lanka has reported over 40 incidents in 2017.

via : http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/tolerating-religious-intolerance/article19141628.ece

« Remembering Lasantha six years on: Launch of photo-essays on Sri Lanka » by Groundviews

Journalist Lasantha Wickrematunge‘s murder on 8th January 2009 was utterly horrible and yet, even more unforgettable was the Rajapaksa government’s reaction to it. Lasantha’s last editorial, published posthumously, didn’t mince words.

It is well known that I was on two occasions brutally assaulted, while on another my house was sprayed with machine-gun fire. Despite the government’s sanctimonious assurances, there was never a serious police inquiry into the perpetrators of these attacks, and the attackers were never apprehended.

In all these cases, I have reason to believe the attacks were inspired by the government. When finally I am killed, it will be the government that kills me.

Six years on, his killers remain at large.

To commemorate Lasantha’s death, Groundviews, in collaboration with The Picture Press and supported by Sri Lankans Without Borders, is pleased to release a set of three compelling investigative photo-essays, looking at Sri Lanka’s religious diversity as well as flagging to what extent it is under threat today.

As noted in the introduction to each photo essay, this content is « a tribute to a journalist whose brutal murder has impoverished us all, irrespective of whether we agreed with him or not… and also a tribute to Sri Lanka as it has always been and must continue to be – a rich, diverse, multi-religious and multi-ethnic society. »

Click on the link to access each essay:

The photo essays use Microsoft’s new Sway platform, which is completely responsive and tailors the content to whatever browser you are viewing it from, from desktop to mobile.

« ‘Fascists’ in saffron robes? The rise of Sri Lanka’s Buddhist ultra-nationalists » by Tim Hume

Paikiasothy Saravanamuttu, executive director of Sri Lanka’s Centre for Policy Alternatives, believed the group, which he described as a purveyor of « classic hate speech, » had become emboldened by the lack of censure over the events at Aluthgama.
« Their more violent or aggressive demonstrations of power, involving even criminal acts, have gone unpunished, » he told CNN. « They seem to have a lot of support, if not protection, from within the regime itself. »

via: http://edition.cnn.com/2014/07/17/world/asia/sri-lanka-bodu-bala-sena-profile/

« Religious Hostilities Reach Six-Year High » by Pew Research Center

Vous trouvez là un lien pour consulter le topo de la BBC sur l’intolérance religieuse et celle envers la religion à travers le monde sauf l’Amérique :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_IKPeoYYKo&feature=em-share_video_user

Réalisé à partir des données d’une étude fort complète du Pew Research Center qu’on peut trouver ici :
www.pewforum.org/2014/01/14/religious-hostilities-reach-six-year-high

source: Pew Research Center

« Concern over increasing intolerance and escalating violence » by Batticaloa Peace Committee

« It is with deep concern that we note a climate of increasing intolerance and escalating violence towards religious minorities. In particular, attacks on places of worship, interference in the observance of religious practices and attacks on business establishments belonging to minorities, all indicate a worrying trend towards public demonstrations of antagonism and violence.

The Batticaloa Peace Committee (BPC), which evolved from The Council of Religions, continues from the time of its inception, to work together with all religious communities in promoting peaceful interactions and relationships between different communities. In the past BPC promoted dialogue between religious leaders of the Tamil and Muslim communities to defuse tensions at times of conflict. On another occasion the BPC facilitated leaders from different religious traditions in mediating a dispute among members of Christian denominations.

While the concerns and sensitivities that provoke conflict between communities must be addressed and recognized through a process of dialogue, the use of violent means to pursue one’s interests will only lead to further alienation and the breakdown of the civic trust so necessary for day to day life in a pluralistic country like ours.

The experience of difference can cause tensions between communities. However, these differences are also a fundamental resource for our shared life together. Therefore, the BPC wishes to reiterate and emphasize the urgent need to find effective non-violent means of communication with compassion and wisdom as its core values to resolve tensions between communities.

The BPC will stand in solidarity and work together with all those of whatever religious community or civic organization who strive towards this end. »

Batticaloa Peace Committee, May 20, 2013

The Batticaloa Peace Committee (BPC), which evolved from The Council of Religions, continues from the time of its inception, to work together with all religious communities in promoting peaceful interactions and relationships between different communities. In the past BPC promoted dialogue between religious leaders of the Tamil and Muslim communities to defuse tensions at times of conflict. On another occasion the BPC facilitated leaders from different religious traditions in mediating a dispute among members of Christian denominations.

source: http://f.cl.ly/items/2K2S1K0b1Q2b1l442j0b/BPC%20STATEMENT.pdf