Soutenance de thèse « Le rituel funéraire hindou en contexte diasporique : rite de passage et rite d’ancrage. La communauté tamoule d’origine sri-lankaise de Montréal et Toronto. » par Mark Bradley, Le vendredi 22 avril 2016 à 9h30, à l’UQAM, salle A-5020

Mark Bradley, doctorant et enseignant au département des sciences des religions de l’Université de Québec à Montréal et chercheur du Centre d’Etudes sur l’Inde, l’Asie du Sud et sa diaspora (CEIAS) soutiendra sa thèse portant sur « le rituel funéraire hindou en contexte diasporique : rite de passage et rite d’ancrage. La communauté tamoule d’origine sri-lankaise de Montréal et Toronto » le vendredi 22 avril 2016. La soutenance se se déroulera à partir de 9h30 à l’UQAM en salle A-5020.

L’entrée est gratuite

« MIA’s Borders: For refugees by refugees Opinion » by Sinthujan Varatharajah

MIA released her latest video « Borders » recently and caused, as she so often does, an Internet uproar. Her self-directed video is a visual commentary on border regimes and the so-called « refugee crisis. » Similar to her previous works, « Borders » immediately gave birth to a number of critical conversations across social media on the politics behind MIA’s imagery.

In her video, the 40-year-old multimedia artist performs in front of a large number of male actors who climb border fences, are cramped together on fishing boats, build a human vessel and sit in thermal blankets on wave breakers. The slick video is impressive and beautiful, to say the least. But it also carries a scathing political message by critiquing the nation-states that construct borders to separate the « haves » from the « have-nots » of this world. In addition, the lyrics also mock hashtag activism by asking « Slaying it / Whats up with that?… Love wins/Whats up with that? »

So far, the video has received widespread critical acclaim and has been called both « daring » and « timely. » Since its launch, it has been described and labeled across media as « MIA travelling with refugees » or « MIA embarking on a refugee journey ». Some journalists wondered why it was MIA, rather than Kanye West, Rihanna or Bono, who first approached the topic of refugees. Others were in awe of the British Tamil artists’ ability to metaphorically visualise an issue that has been marked by dehumanising labels and imageries with, for instance, refugees climbing in a pattern across wire fences to spell « LIFE » with their bodies. »

see: http://www.warscapes.com/opinion/mia-s-borders-refugees-refugees

« Vanishing Hope in Sri Lanka: Amrita Chandradas on Remembering »

Editor’s Note: Amrita Chandradas is a documentary photographer currently based in Singapore and working across Southeast Asia. In 2014 she won the prestigious “Top 30 Under 30” award by Magnum Photographs. In this exclusive article for Fox & Hedgehog she recounts the story of a trip to Sri Lanka to document the aftereffects of the civil war. You can view more of Amrita’s work on her website.

Sri Lanka—known for her pristine beaches, lush wild jungles, and exotic food—has successfully concealed a dark past of civil unrest and political instability for the last three decades. She is an island divided by twenty-six years of civil war between the Sri Lankan Military and the Tamil Tigers, one of the largest rebel guerrilla forces in the world. The Tigers, otherwise known as LTTE, are infamous for inventing suicide belts; they used women in suicide attacks and successfully assassinated two international political leaders. Sri Lankan society plunged into segregation during the year 1948 when she achieved her independence from the British.

to read more: http://foxhedgehog.com/2015/10/vanishing-hope-in-sri-lanka-amrita-chandradas-on-remembering/

« Sri Lanka : les séquelles de la guerre », in Revue Hérodote n°158, dossier Postconflit : entre guerre et paix, par Eric Meyer et Delon Madavan

Le numéro 158 de la célèbre revue Hérodote, parue en octobre, fait suite à la journée d’étude « Territoires du post-conflit », codirigée par Elisabeth Dorier (LPED – Aix-Marseille Université) et Amaël Cattaruzza (CREC – Ecoles de Saint-Cyr Coëtquidan).

Définie par les Nations unies, la notion de postconflit désigne un modèle idéal de transition après une guerre, impliquant institutions internationales, États et acteurs civils, privés et associatifs, afin de surmonter ensemble les tensions et (re)construire une paix durable. La terminologie internationale du postconflit définit une norme d’intervention impliquant une série d’actions standardisées : urgence humanitaire, post-urgence, transition, state-building, processus de réconciliation, reconstruction et développement, etc.

Cependant, les discours institutionnels présentant l’intervention postconflit comme une technique neutre sont contestables puisqu’ils évacuent les enjeux politiques, les rivalités de pouvoir et les impacts indésirables du processus lui-même.

L’objectif de ce numéro est de rassembler différents éclairages territoriaux montrant les décalages entre idéal et réalité, ainsi que les points communs à des programmes internationaux engagés de manière similaire dans des contextes différents. Il contribue aussi à un positionnement de la géographie comme outil de lecture spécifique, les contributions proposant des analyses à différentes échelles des jeux d’acteurs et dynamiques territoriales entre guerre et paix.

Table des matières       

Éditorial , par Béatrice Giblin

Postconflit : entre guerre et paix ?  par Amaël Cattaruzza et Elisabeth Dorier

Conflits et représentation du conflit au Pays basque : la fin de l’ETA , par Barbara Loyer

Stratégies violentes et non-violentes pour le contrôle de l’espace républicain de Belfast , par Guilhem Marotte

Créer une frontière dans le postconflit : Le cas du Nord-Kosovo et de Mitrovica , par Amaël Cattaruzza et Jean-Arnault Dérens ;

Conflits sans fin à la frontière gréco-albanaise ?,  par Pierre Sintès ;

Projets, arrangements et controverses sur la ligne de démarcation à Beyrouth , par Jihad Farah ;

Du succès du cessez-le-feu à l’échec de la paix, l’expérience des monts Nouba au Soudan (2002-2005) , par Marc Lavergne ;

Dynamiques territoriales du postconflit et de la reconstruction au Congo-Brazzaville , par Elisabeth Dorier et Hubert Mazureck ;

Déplacés de guerre et dynamiques territoriales postconflit au Mozambique , par Jeanne Vivet ;

Femmes du Sud-Kivu, victimes et actrices en situation de conflit et postconflit , par Justin Sheria Nfundiko ;

Les tribulations du dispositif Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réinsertion des miliciens en Côte d’Ivoire (2003-2015) , par Magali Chelpi-den Hamer ;

Sri Lanka : les séquelles de la guerre , Eric Meyer et Delon Madavan ;

 

référence bibliographique: Meyer E. et D. Madavan, « Sri Lanka : les séquelles de la guerre », in Revue Hérodote n°158, dossier Post conflit : entre guerre et paix

« The Burmese Indians who never went home » by Anbarasan Ethirajan

A story on Burmese Tamil refugees who were displaced to Manipur, India, following a coup in the 1960s that led to race riots against ‘Indians’. Hundreds of Jaffna Tamils, who were brought to Burma as part of the British colonial apparatus, were also affected and returned to Ceylon in the wake of the violence. They are remembered as Rangun Tamils.

« When they reached the border crossing, Burmese soldiers prevented them from entering the country. The Tamils settled in Moreh hoping one day to return to their homeland – but those dreams have never been fulfilled. »

via: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-33973982

 » Even God Cannot Save Tamils if People Vote for Diaspora Backed TNPF – ACTC “Cycle” » by D.B.S.Jeyaraj

« The ACTC/TNPF is strongly backed and heavily influenced by LTTE and Pro-LTTE elements in the Global Tamil Diaspora.These tiger and pro-tiger elements are strongly opposed to the TNA and its current political approach of working towards an acceptable political settlement within a united but not necessarily unitary Sri Lanka. The overall objective of these elements is two – fold. Revive the LTTE in some form and engage in violence in Sri Lanka. Undermine the political process and disrupt all positive political engagement between Tamil representatives and the Governments in power in Colombo. »

« Comeback Hopes Dim for Mahinda Rajapaksa, Sri Lanka’s Ex-President » by David Barstow

“It is very difficult to keep Rajapaksa out, I would think,” said Paikiasothy Saravanamuttu, who runs an election monitoring group and a policy research organization in Sri Lanka. On the other hand, he noted, every recent poll shows Mr. Rajapaksa trailing, and there is “no demonstrable evidence of any kind of swing or shift to him.”

see: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/world/asia/comeback-hopes-dim-for-mahinda-rajapaksa-sri-lankas-ex-president.html

« Five Things to Know About Sri Lanka’s General Elections » by Nikhil Kumar

‘Minority votes are likely to go in favor of Sirisena’s supporters, while one recent CPA opinion poll showed that although Rajapaksa retained the backing of many Sinhalese Buddhists, with 36% favoring him as the next Prime Minister, a significant section of the majority community also supported his chief rival and Sirisena’s ally, Ranil Wickremesinghe, who was backed by nearly 32%.’

http://time.com/…/five-things-sri-lanka-general-elections-…/

« China’s man-made island takes shape in Sri Lanka » by Channel NewsAsia

« The Ocean seafood restaurant at Colombo’s five-star The Kingsbury was once famous for its magnificent view of the Indian Ocean. Its open-air wooden terrace that runs along the hotel’s western façade used to be so close to the beautiful coastline that waves lapped the rocks, sending sprays of sea foam into the air. Not anymore »

see: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/china-s-man-made-island/2051350.html

« Sri Lankan ice-cream parlour gains fame after surviving brutal conflict » by Channel NewsAsia

After the end of decades of armed conflict, an ice-cream parlour in war-torn Jaffna has gained popularity among Sri Lankans, thanks to its persistence in remaining open despite the violence.

see: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/sri-lankan-ice-cream/2052282.html

« Former Tamil Tigers set to contest upcoming Sri Lankan election » by Channel NewsAsia

Sivanathan Navindra was once known as Venthan, a former bodyguard of the slain Velupillai Prabhakaran, leader of the world’s deadliest terrorist organisation at the time, the Tamil Tigers.

When Sri Lanka goes to the polls on Aug 17, Mr Sivanathan will be a candidate, hoping to be elected as a member of parliament.

see: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/former-tamil-tigers-set/2045446.html

« Torture of Tamil detainees in Sri Lanka has continued, says charity » by Julian Borger

Sri Lankan security forces have continued to torture Tamil detainees even after the election of reformist president Maithripala Sirisena in January, according to a report.

The report, by the UK-based charity Freedom From Torture (FFT) and published on Thursday, comes just four days before critical parliamentary elections on 17 August. Sirisena, elected on a promise to lift government repression, is seeking to prevent a comeback by his predecessor, Mahinda Rajapaksa, whose government has been accused of systematic brutality against the country’s Tamils after the military rout of the Tamil Tiger rebels in 2009.

see: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/13/torture-tamil-detainees-sri-lanka-report-alleges

« Sri Lanka’s Minority Outreach Holds Risks Before Vote » by Uditha Jayasinghe

Sri Lanka’s government has been reaching out to the country’s influential Tamil diaspora with the aim of building minority support and boosting its international standing. But the contentious strategy holds risks for the government’s survival ahead of parliamentary elections next week.

see: http://www.wsj.com/articles/sri-lankas-minority-outreach-holds-risks-before-vote-1439436855