“Cette immigration asiatique qui consomme local” par Philippe Hage Boutros

Le Liban compte un grand nombre de personnes issues de l’immigration en provenance d’Asie du Sud. En l’absence de statistiques officielles détaillées sur leurs habitudes de consommation, « L’Orient-Le Jour » est parti à la rencontre de Sri Lankais, de Bangladais et d’Indiens afin de chercher à définir leur degré de participation à l’économie locale.

via: http://www.lorientlejour.com/article/889459/cette-immigration-asiatique-qui-consomme-local.html

“Liking violence: A study of hate speech on Facebook in Sri Lanka” by CPA

24 September 2014, Colombo, Sri Lanka: The Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA) is pleased to launch ‘Liking violence: A study of hate speech on Facebook in Sri Lanka’, authored by Shilpa Samaratunge and Sanjana Hattotuwa.

Download the full report here or read it online here. Download just the Introduction and Executive Summary here or read it online here.

The report is the first in Sri Lanka to focus on hate and dangerous speech in online fora, contextualising the growth of this disturbing digital content with increasing violence against Muslims and other groups in Sri Lanka. As the blurb on the front cover of the report avers,

“The growth of online hate speech in Sri Lanka does not guarantee another pogrom. It does however pose a range of other challenges to government and governance around social, ethnic, cultural and religious co-existence, diversity and, ultimately, to the very core of debates around how we see and organise ourselves post-war.”

The report looks at 20 Facebook groups in Sri Lanka over a couple of months, focussing on content generated just before, during and immediately after violence against the Muslim community. Detailed translations into English of the original material posted to these groups (including photographic and visual content) and the responses they generated are provided. It is the first time a study has translated into English the qualitative nature of commentary and content published on these Facebook groups, indicative of a larger and growing malaise in post-war Sri Lanka.

More generally, the study looks at the phenomenon of hate speech online – how it occurs and spreads online, what kind of content is produced, by whom and for which audiences. In addition to Sri Lanka, policy frameworks and legislation around online hate speech in Kenya, Rwanda, India, Pakistan, Canada and Australia are also flagged in the report.

“First Batch of Army Recruits from Jaffna to Pass Out on Sept.20” by News.lk

Asylum seekers who sought protection in Australia and were returned to Sri Lanka say they have been tortured, in new claims aired on SBS.

In an SBS Dateline program aired on Tuesday night two asylum seekers – known as Bhanu and Narada – made allegations they had been tortured after being returned to Sri Lanka from Australia.

via: http://www.news.lk/news/sri-lanka/item/3001-first-batch-of-army-recruits-from-jaffna-to-pass-out-on-sept-20

“Sri Lanka: “Don’t force political issues on the Pope, says Cardinal Ranjith” by Vatican Insider

“Don’t force political issues on the Pope, don’t use his visit to Sri Lanka for political ends”: the Archbishop of Colombo, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, sent out a clear appeal to the Sri Lankan government and the opposition. Francis’ visit to the country (13-15 January 2015) comes right before the presidential elections. Given how heated the situation there is, the Pope’s visit could easily be exploited for the purposes of propaganda, particularly by the government. The wounds of civil war are still fresh, there are still tensions between the Sinhalese and the Tamils and Buddhist fundamentalism and nationalism is ever present. The Sri Lankan Church has asked for the suspension of rallies and other initiatives linked to the election campaigns during Francis’ three-day visit to the island.”

via: http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/world-news/detail/articolo/francesco-sri-lanka-36321/

“Hardline Buddhists in Myanmar, Sri Lanka Strike Anti-Islamist Pact” by Voice of America

A Myanmar monk accused of inciting violence against Muslims and a hardline Buddhist group in Sri Lanka said on Tuesday they would work together to rally other Buddhist groups and defend their faith against militant Islamists.

via: http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-hardline-buddhists-myanmar-sri-lanka-anti-islamist-pact/2467590.html

“Sri Lanka’s Prevention of Terrorism Act should be repealed” by Meera Srinivasan

It has been nearly 200 days since the TID arrested Ms. Jeyakumari in Kilinochchi, along with her teenaged daughter. She was at the forefront in campaigns against involuntary disappearances, raising concern about her son who reportedly went missing in the final phase of the war. While the daughter is in probationary custody in a children’s home, Ms. Jeyakumari continues to be detained with no charges filed till date. At least 80 persons have been arrested under the PTA Act in Sri Lanka this year.

Via http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/south-asia/sri-lankas-prevention-of-terrorism-act-should-be-repealed/article6459779.ece

“News from Jaffna” by Aljazeera

“If the situation became precarious, I could always take a flight to my other home, the UK, but this is obviously not an option for your news reporter in the north.

Since returning to Sri Lanka, I often wondered what my life might have been like had my family not left. Would my life be so different from the journalists I met at Uthayan had my family stayed in Jaffna?”

Via http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/viewfinder/2014/09/news-from-jaffna-2014926135629688613.html

“Launch of ‘Mudivuraatha Yuththam’ (The Unfinished War)” by Maatram

Maatram, the Tamil civic media initiative based at the Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA) is pleased to present ‘Mudivuraatha Yuththam’ (The Unfinished War), Sri Lanka’s first example of long-form journalism for produced specifically for the web.

 

Inspired by award-winning examples of modern day story-telling on the web by the New York Times, Al Jazeera, The Global Mail and other leading media institutions, ‘Mudivuraatha Yuththam’ is designed to be accessible over broadband on any modern browser as well as via recent smartphones and tablets. Cutting-edge presentation is married to compelling original content, anchored to five key sections.

  • Displacement: Focussing on families from Sampur in Trincomalee, who have been IDPs since 2007.
  • Abductions: With information derived from the Red Cross and other institutions, both domestic and international, this section looks at abductions both during and after the war. Ways through which the government has tried to address this issue are flagged, with a focus on the civilians participating in these official mechanisms. A video interview with a woman who had handed in her son to the Army at the end of the way is also featured in this section.
  • Land grabbing: Incidents of land grabs by the Sri Lankan military in Walikamam North are highlighted in this section. The story of a family affected by these land grabs is included as a video documentary. An important feature under this section is information obtained through a member of the Northern Provincial Council about the Sinhalisation of Mullaitivu.
  • Militarisation: The presence of military in the Northern Sri Lanka is looked into and depicted through images and text. This section also looks at how the military is heavily involved in the development processes of the North.
  • Development: This section looks into the illegal destruction of personal property by the military and the Ministry of Defence, and the resulting displacement of these affected.

Each section features video, photography and text respectively shot and written specifically for the site.  Access ‘Mudivuraatha Yuththam’ here.

***

Maatram, established in early 2014, is aimed at Tamil readers across Sri Lanka and in the diaspora. In addition to original reporting and content generation in Tamil, Maatram also features translations of material sourced from Groundviews and Vikalpa to ensure a wider readership and deeper appreciation of issues mainstream media in Sri Lanka will not or cannot publish, produce or promote.

Maatram is also on Twitter and Facebook.

“In Sri Lanka, ‘fear and insecurity’ for journalists, activists” by UCAnews

On October 2 and 3, more than 300 journalists, lawyers and activists demonstrated in central Colombo, calling for an end to attacks against members of their professions. They say the threats have created a hostile environment where speaking and writing the truth is a dangerous proposition.

via: http://groundviews.org/2014/10/03/in-sri-lanka-fear-and-insecurity-for-journalists-activists/

“No softening of stand on Sri Lanka: US” by The Economic Times

The US has said that there has been no softening of its stand on Sri Lanka with regard to the human rights situation in that country, as being reported in a section of the media.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/44179834.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

“Ising and Ramaswamy showcase works at Faculty Writers Read event” by thisweekincas.com

English instructor Daniel Ising read two short stories or pieces of fiction writing while English professor Anushiya Ramaswamy recited her translations of a Sri Lankan refuge writer’s narratives.

Ramaswamy’s translations of Sri Lankan writer Shobasakthi describe how the Tamil Tiger militants publicly punished prostitutes during the 1980s.

According to Ramaswamy, one of the ways the Tamil militants promoted themselves as society builders was by killing women they regarded as prostitutes.

“They made them into public women and then killed them saying that these are social ills and that they are so good for the community because, look, they have gotten rid of these prostitutes,” Ramaswamy said.

Ramaswamy will release her latest translations, “The MGR Murder Trial and Other Stories” in December through Penguin publishers in India…

via: http://thisweekincas.com/2014/10/05/ising-and-ramaswamy-showcase-works-at-faculty-writers-read-event/