« Internal Political Power Bashing in the Name of Justice for War Victims » by Rajan Hoole, N. Sivapalan, Ahilan Kadirgamar and K. Sritharan

« The UN Human Rights Commission’s decision to investigate violations and the huge loss of life during the last months of the war concluded in 2009 was a significant victory for the victims. The dignity of the victims required that the truth must be told without fear or favour, and processes of justice and restoration set in motion. And the wrong was not all on one side. Dignity also demands that we await the verdict of the judges with restraint and reverence for the name of justice. »

via: http://www.island.lk/index.php?page_cat=article-details&page=article-details&code_title=120781

« U.N. Human Rights chief says access not a must for Sri Lanka war crimes probe » by Nita Bhalla

« It is important to understand that this investigation was set up for the benefit of all Sri Lankans, as an avenue to achieve lasting peace and reconciliation, » she said.
« It is in this context that the Human Rights Council-mandated investigation should be viewed, rather than being seen as a confrontation. »

via: https://in.news.yahoo.com/u-n-human-rights-chief-says-access-not-120813441.html

« 2013 Report on International Religious Freedom – Sri Lanka » by UNHCR

The Sinhala Buddhist group Bodu Bala Sena (BBS, « Forces of Buddhist Power ») continued to promote views religious and ethnic minorities considered hostile. Local media and NGOs noted strong linkages between the BBS and the government, particularly Secretary of Defense (and brother of the president) Gotabaya Rajapaksa, who appeared prominently at public BBS events during the year. In response to pressure from this group, municipal councils began passing regulations prohibiting the slaughter of cows, a BBS demand, in their areas.

At times, local police and government officials appeared to be acting in concert with Buddhist nationalist organizations. Evangelical Christian churches, especially in the south, reported increased pressure and harassment by local government bodies to suspend worship activities or close down if they were not registered with the government, despite no legal requirement to do so. The National Christian Evangelical Alliance of Sri Lanka (NCEASL) stated that « dozens » of churches from all parts of the country had been questioned about their legality by local government officials and police.

via: http://www.refworld.org/docid/53d9070f14.html